UCSB Keep Teaching

Teach and Learn from Anywhere!

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Review the Educational Technology Tutorials,
Post to the Keep Teaching Nectir Channel, or
Email the Help Desk for individualized questions about:

  • Pedagogical and technical support for teaching (in-person, online, and everything in between!)
  • Classroom Equipment (lecterns, cameras, software, microphones, etc.)
  • Support with educational technologies (GauchoSpace, GauchoCast, Zoom,GradeScope Nectir, ELI peer review)

This resource is jointly updated and supported by Instructional Development, CITRAL, and Collaborate.

Instructional FAQs Fall 2022

The following FAQs are informed by the Chancellor’s memos to campus and the Academic Senate’s memos to campus.

Permission to Teach and Learn Remotely (F22)

How much teaching can be done online for a course that is scheduled “in-person?”

Instructors are allowed to teach up to 50% of their course online without having to get approval from the Academic Senate. 50% is defined from the students’ perspective, on a weekly basis; inclusive of discussion sections. Office hours do not count toward the 50% and can be held in-person or remotely at the discretion of the instructor. Discussion sections must be held in-person.

For more details see the EVC's memo to campus from Aug 1, 2022.

How can an instructor or TA request permission to teach remotely?

Instructors and TAs with specific medical conditions may request accommodations through the interactive workplace accommodation process with HR. That process is only available in cases where the employee's own serious health condition is at issue. Overseas employees who cannot enter the US due to visa or travel restrictions must follow the process outlined by Academic Personnel.

Instructors, including Teaching Associates and TAs,  who live with a family member or household member who is moderately to severely immunocompromised, as defined by the CDC’s current recommendations for an additional vaccine shot, may seek a workplace adjustment to teach remotely for Fall 2022. The workplace adjustment is offered at the discretion of the Academic Senate, and is different and distinct from workplace accommodations for the instructors themselves, which are assessed by the campus Workplace Accommodations Specialist in Human Resources. The Senate has delegated to the academic deans of the various Schools, Colleges, and Divisions the authority to grant a workplace adjustment involving remote teaching if the instructor provides the required attestation of cohabitation and physician’s certification.

If an instructor has permission to teach remotely, how are TAs expected to proceed?

All courses and sections that are scheduled in-person are expected to be taught in-person. An instructor’s accommodation or adjustment to teach remotely does not affect the way that a TA teaches discussion section or lab, and vice-versa.

Can instructors offer their office hours online, by Zoom, instead of hosting them in-person?

Yes. TAs may also hold office hours online, by Zoom, with the consent of the course instructor.

If an instructor or TA has to isolate or quarantine, or stay home to care for a dependent who is isolating or quarantined, may they teach remotely?

Excerpt from the Aug 1, 2022 memo from the EVC:

"Instructors who must miss class for brief periods for medical reasons should consult their department chair to determine whether they are able to teach remotely or record their lectures or whether substitutes are needed to cover their classes."

How should instructors respond to remote instruction requests from students?

Excerpt from the Aug 1, 2022 memo from the EVC:

"Instructors should ensure that reasonable alternatives are available to students who must miss class for brief periods for medical reasons. Instructors will decide how to provide access to course content; this may or may not include the recording of lectures or discussions. Instructors should state their policy at the beginning of the course."

What do I do when a student requests DSP accommodation?

DSP accommodation procedures remain consistent. Students should be referred to the Disabled Students Program, who will make a determination about the student’s request and communicate with instructors to discuss potential accommodations.

Masking Questions

What are the current masking policies?
I have concerns about teaching unmasked students. What can I do?

When there is no campus mandate to wear masks in the classroom, but you are concerned about teaching unmasked students, you can…

  • Choose to wear a mask while you teach.
  • Remind students that masking is strongly recommended by the campus and the county public health officer (current as of March 2022).
  • Remind students that, after the mask mandate expires, they may continue to wear a mask, but that doing so is optional.
  • Adapt this sample language for syllabi or class: “Masks will be required through the first week of the quarter, per University policy. After that, it will be important that we respect one another’s choices regarding whether or not to wear masks.”
  • Hold office hours remotely. If you hold office hours in person, you must allow all students to attend (masked or unmasked).
  • Seek employment accommodations or permission to teach remotely.  Contact Human Resources about available processes and required documentation.
Can I encourage students to wear masks once the campus no longer requires them?

While you can share own reasons for masking, once the mask mandate expires, you CANNOT:

  • Require, coerce or pressure students to wear masks when campus policies no longer require masking.
  • Require unmasked students to leave your classroom or office after the campus indoor mask mandate has expired
  • Refuse to instruct (and/or provide other educational services to) students who are not wearing a mask if masking is not mandated by the campus.
How can I help ensure that students comply when masking is mandated?

From Margaret Klawunn's 9/13 Academic Senate Town Hall presentation:

-Stay calm and connected

-Remind the student of the requirement to wear a mask covering nose and mouth in all indoor spaces at UCSB; masks are avaialble at several locations on campus, ex. Ask Me Kiosks staffed by Student Affairs

- Present options - "please put on the mask correctly so I can continue class;" "if you don't put the mask on I may have to dismiss class."

- If a student refuses, you might ask the student to step outside of the classroom

- Dismiss the in-person session for the day, putting social pressure on the students who is inconveniencing classmates

- Have the class take a break

- If persistent resistance to this requirement, you can report the student to the Office of Student Conduct

What masks are best for teaching?

We can only offer anecdotal advice about the comfort of masks, and encourage you to bring a few different kinds to try in your classroom.  We’ve heard from instructors who appreciate the lightweight fit of a surgical mask, the comfort of cloth masks, (but be aware that they may get wet as you are speaking, so bring a backup), and the airspace provided by the KN-95 mask. Masks with a see-through plastic portion for your mouth are permitted (per UCSB Student Health officials, 9/16/21) and may be particularly helpful for teaching foreign languages (Ex 1Ex 2). Face shields with drop cloths, or face coverings made entirely of plastic, are not currently approved (as of 9/2/21), unless they are needed for a medical condition after approval through HR Workplace Accommodations.

Providing Students Access to Lectures: Recording and Dual-mode teaching (live-streaming)

Should I record my lectures?

Recording lectures can provide access to students who need to miss class or to all students who want to review lectures after class. Instructors may choose to record their lectures and how widely to share them (i.e. with the whole class or with specific students who have excused absences).  You can use the Panopto recording software, available in all General Assignment classrooms, to record a screencast of your lecture and your voice. You can record “Boardwork” using your tablet computer or a document camera (check to see if your classroom has one in the General Assignment (GA) classroom inventory or request a doc camera from Instructional Development).  The video will upload to your class GauchoCast folder. (Note: add the GauchoCast block to your GauchoSpace site for students to be able to access the recordings.)  

Per the Academic Senate's 3/17/22 memorandum, "classroom recordings must supplement rather than replace in-person instruction."

Should I allow students to remotely join my in-person class, synchronously, via Zoom?

Dual-mode teaching, sometimes called “live-streaming hybrid'' or “hyflex” teaching, allows students to join your live class either in-person or online. Per the EVC's Aug 1, 2022 memo, live-streaming is not allowed in Fall Quarter. According to an earlier memo, it "could result in some students receiving fully online instruction, for which our programs are not accredited." You may wish to adapt or include this language in your syllabus, in case students request to join the class remotely.

If you are teaching or proposing an online course (for which dual-mode teaching would be allowed), be aware that dual-mode teaching requires careful planning, comfort with relevant technology, and the ability to engage two unique populations of students, simultaneously.  In general, dual-mode teaching requires additional preparation, as well as a second person (such as a TA) to assist during the session. Use this document, “Dual-Mode Teaching: Caution and Considerations,” to help you decide if it's a good fit for you.

Legal considerations for recording lectures: How can students opt out of a lecture recording?

Instructors should advise students: 1) that the class is being recorded, and 2) that if someone doesn’t want their voice recorded, they can pose their question after class or during office hours. Students must have advance knowledge that the class is being recorded, be able to opt-out of being recorded without penalty, and be given an alternative means for asking questions. If participation in a class is expected or required, please see the “Alternatives to recording (TA) discussion based classes” FAQ.

Alternatives to recording (TA) discussion-based classes

Because discussions/sections are far more interactive than lectures, it is not recommended that these be recorded. Instead, consider creating an “educationally equivalent alternative” assignment and materials for students who miss class. For example, students could participate in an online discussion forum, take an online quiz, or participate in a collaborative exercise using Google Docs. Consider taking photos of boardwork, posting all your class materials (e.g. handouts), and getting students to volunteer as class note-takers on a shared Google Doc (for credit). Describe your policies for communicating and completing homework with an excused absence in your (section) syllabus, and repeat them frequently in both written and verbal formats.

It is wise to set up clear channels for communication and a process for sharing section materials through UCSB’s supported educational technology platforms: GauchoSpace, Nectir, and/or Google Drive. These platforms provide FERPA-compliant spaces for students to chat formally and informally about what they missed or how to complete an assignment.

Instructional FAQs Winter 2022

For the temporary remote instructional period at the start of Winter quarter, the Classroom Services team is available to provide assistance with GauchoCast, Zoom and online instruction via help@id.ucsb.edu. For questions regarding General Assignment Classrooms, equipment use and all other matters, please contact help@id.ucsb.edu, or come to the Media Equipment Office, located at 1160 Kerr Hall.

Our online support desk is open Monday – Friday 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM. We will be closed December 29th – January 3rd.

How will you deliver course content?

When teaching remotely, you can deliver content asynchronously or synchronously or in a blend of the two formats.

What about sections?

Sections should be taught synchronously online at the scheduled time. Have your TAs include a separate Zoom link on GauchoSpace for their sections. TAs can make sections interactive to help students feel supported in a community of learners. Instructors and TAs may want to review the TA resources for resilient teaching

How will students know how to access the course?

How should I design my GauchoSpace site?

Multiple UCSB student surveys attest to the importance of a well-organized GauchoSpace site with a consistent weekly pattern, clear names/titles for materials, and instructions for assignments.

How can I use materials from previous courses?

If you are teaching a course that you previously offered remotely, you can import materials from the earlier version(s) of the course(s). Double-check that course links, dates, and instructions are updated after importing. Note: the campus is in the process of updating the GauchoCast video recording/storage service. Please wait to import GauchoCast videos until the week of December 27. Email help@id.ucsb.edu for additional questions.


Fall 2021 FAQs for Remote Instruction

The well-being of our UCSB community is of the utmost importance, along with ensuring that our students are able to make progress toward their degrees. Please use the 6 key takeaways from Designing Courses for Resilience to ensure that students can continue learning, even if they must self-isolate or quarantine; these practices tend to benefit ALL students. At a minimum, make sure that students have access to all the course materials that they need to complete the course requirements. We ask you to allow extensions on course requirements, to the extent possible, to encourage students who are unwell to stay at home.

You can draw on, and adapt, this sample syllabus language, which includes information about Covid 19 for in-person classes.

Providing Students Access to Lectures: Recording and Dual-mode teaching (live-streaming)

Should I record my lectures?

Recording lectures can provide access to students who need to miss class or to all students who want to review lectures after class. Instructors may choose to record their lectures and how widely to share them (i.e. with the whole class or with specific students who have excused absences).  You can use the Panopto recording software, available in all General Assignment classrooms, to record a screencast of your lecture and your voice. You can record “Boardwork” using your tablet computer or a document camera (check to see if your classroom has one in the General Assignment (GA) classroom inventory or request a doc camera from Instructional Development).  The video will upload to your class GauchoCast folder. (Note: add the GauchoCast block to your GauchoSpace site for students to be able to access the recordings.)  

Per the Academic Senate's 3/17/22 memorandum, "classroom recordings must supplement rather than replace in-person instruction."

Should I allow students to remotely join my in-person class, synchronously, via Zoom?

Dual-mode teaching, sometimes called “live-streaming hybrid'' or “hyflex” teaching, allows students to join your live class either in-person or online. Per the EVC's Aug 1, 2022 memo, live-streaming is not allowed in Fall Quarter. According to an earlier memo, it "could result in some students receiving fully online instruction, for which our programs are not accredited." You may wish to adapt or include this language in your syllabus, in case students request to join the class remotely.

If you are teaching or proposing an online course (for which dual-mode teaching would be allowed), be aware that dual-mode teaching requires careful planning, comfort with relevant technology, and the ability to engage two unique populations of students, simultaneously.  In general, dual-mode teaching requires additional preparation, as well as a second person (such as a TA) to assist during the session. Use this document, “Dual-Mode Teaching: Caution and Considerations,” to help you decide if it's a good fit for you.

Legal considerations for recording lectures: How can students opt out of a lecture recording?

Instructors should advise students: 1) that the class is being recorded, and 2) that if someone doesn’t want their voice recorded, they can pose their question after class or during office hours. Students must have advance knowledge that the class is being recorded, be able to opt-out of being recorded without penalty, and be given an alternative means for asking questions. If participation in a class is expected or required, please see the “Alternatives to recording (TA) discussion based classes” FAQ.

Alternatives to recording (TA) discussion-based classes

Because discussions/sections are far more interactive than lectures, it is not recommended that these be recorded. Instead, consider creating an “educationally equivalent alternative” assignment and materials for students who miss class. For example, students could participate in an online discussion forum, take an online quiz, or participate in a collaborative exercise using Google Docs. Consider taking photos of boardwork, posting all your class materials (e.g. handouts), and getting students to volunteer as class note-takers on a shared Google Doc (for credit). Describe your policies for communicating and completing homework with an excused absence in your (section) syllabus, and repeat them frequently in both written and verbal formats.

It is wise to set up clear channels for communication and a process for sharing section materials through UCSB’s supported educational technology platforms: GauchoSpace, Nectir, and/or Google Drive. These platforms provide FERPA-compliant spaces for students to chat formally and informally about what they missed or how to complete an assignment.

Intellectual Property Concerns

The information below comes from the EVC’s March 2020 Guidance on Copyright of Course Materials at UC Santa Barbara.

How can I protect my course materials from being distributed?

The following are steps you can take to help protect your materials:

  1. Post your materials only on a platform that has been approved by UC Santa Barbara and that is password-protected and accessible only to enrolled or auditing students.
  2. Advise students that your course materials, including recordings of your course presentations, are protected and that students may not share them except as provided by U.S. copyright law and University policy. You can share this information with students in your first class meeting, on your course website, and in your syllabus. Here is some sample language.
  3. Additional resources: 

Ventilation and Outdoor Instruction

Does my classroom have adequate ventilation?

From the Sept. 8, 2021 EVC’s Fall Quarter Academic Planning Update

Our academic and research buildings were evaluated by Design, Facilities, and Safety Services and outside experts to ensure that ventilation meets or exceeds requirements defined by the State of California. Our practices are consistent with guidelines provided by the CDC and parameters for air change rates, ventilation, and air filtration provided by organizations such as the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers. Where needed, maintenance was performed and modifications or enhancements were made to ensure that ventilation and filters are optimized in instructional spaces. In consultation with faculty experts, informed by up-to-date models and studies, Design, Facilities, and Safety Services is taking additional steps to ensure that systems will be operating efficiently in ways that will reduce the risk of transmission in classrooms. Public Health authorities have determined that classrooms can operate at their normal capacity. Physical distancing is no longer required since studies indicate that in this context it provides no significant benefit in addition to vaccinations and masks. Real-world transmission studies, along with testing data from other campuses, continue to indicate low risks of infection in classrooms when there are high vaccination rates, masking, symptom screening, and testing.

Can classes be scheduled outside?

There are currently no outdoor spaces that can be reserved for instruction. The Instructional and Study Spaces working committee explored this possibility, but found that outdoor classrooms were not currently feasible; they are very complex and expensive, because they require shade tents, chairs, amplification, screens, projection, lecterns, whiteboards, etc. For small classes, it may be feasible to learn outside; we recommend that you check in with students in case they have mobility or hearing conditions that would require an accommodation.

Ensuring Compliance with Covid 19 Classroom Protocols

The following information was provided by UCSB Student Health. We will make every effort to keep this information updated, but please refer to UCSB Covid-19 Information page for the most up to date and official information.

Can I check that students in my class have been cleared after taking UCSB’s Daily Covid-19 screening survey?

The UCSB Daily COVID-19 Screening Survey produces a CLEARANCE BADGE which you can ask the student to show you on their cellphone. Students access it through the Student Health website Patient Portal. The badge will indicate if they are compliant with COVID-19 vaccinations and any COVID-19 testing requirements. The individual answers to questions on the survey are considered medical information and kept confidential.

Am I allowed to ask my students or teaching assistants if they are fully vaccinated?

No, this is considered confidential medical information, but it is incorporated into the UCSB Daily COVID-19 Screening Survey CLEARANCE BADGE. Over 92% of UCSB students are currently fully vaccinated. Students can receive a daily green clearance badge only if they are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or have an approved exemption, exception or temporary deferral. Students with approved exemptions, exceptions or temporary deferrals are required to take  a weekly campus COVID-19 test, and they will not obtain a green clearance badge if they are non-compliant.

Who is responsible for tracking compliance for graduate students and teaching assistants?

UCSB's Student Health has been confidentially storing the student, staff, and faculty COVID-19 vaccination documentation, processing exemption requests and tracking compliance with the UC systemwide vaccine policy that requires all UC employees and students to be vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus or receive an approved exemption before they will be allowed in any UC facility or office or to participate in any University programs. The Student Affairs Office of Student Conduct has notified any student not in compliance by the policy deadline that they are not allowed on the UCSB campus until those requirements are met. They will not be able to obtain a daily green COVID-19 clearance badge without being compliant.

What will happen with students who have no access to the vaccine (e.g., international students,)?

If a student was not able to access an authorized vaccine before arriving  on campus, they were instructed to apply for a "Temporary Deferral," which allows them to obtain the vaccine upon arrival. Student Health is offering COVID-19 vaccines to faculty, staff, and students at no charge, by appointment through the Student Health Patient Portal. Such students must complete their vaccination series by November 11, 2021, or the compliance disciplinary process will be initiated. While they are completing their vaccination series, students will be required to follow campus guidance for unvaccinated students who have secured exemptions (including campus COVID-19 testing weekly, initial 7-day sequestration for campus housing residents, completing the Daily COVID-19 Screening Survey, and wearing face coverings indoors) until two weeks after their vaccination series is complete.

What Happens When a Student Tests Positive for COVID-19?

The following information was provided by UCSB Student Health. We will make every effort to keep this information updated, but please refer to UCSB Covid-19 Information page for the most up to date and official information.

How does COVID-19 contact investigation work at UCSB?

A case investigator from the UCSB COVID-19 Medical Response Team first reaches out to an individual who has tested positive for COVID-19 on campus to:

  • alert them to their positive diagnosis
  • provide direction and support for the required 10 days of isolation
  • offer medical care at Student Health for students, and encourage others to see private healthcare
  • gather information about recent close contacts and social activities

As a next step, university contact investigators will reach out to on-campus individuals identified as "close contacts" (as defined by the CDC) to provide guidance on quarantine, testing and care per public health guidance. Fully vaccinated persons do not need to quarantine after an exposure as long as they do not have symptoms. Unvaccinated persons must quarantine for 10 days after a close contact exposure.  The confidentiality of individuals with positive results will be protected, and their name and COVID-19 status will not be shared with close contacts. Employees and students are required to cooperate with the contact tracing process in a timely fashion.

The UCSB COVID-19 Medical Response Team works closely with the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department's COVID-19 contact tracers and shares interview information with them to ensure complete evaluations are done. Persons with new positive COVID-19 test results may also be contacted by public health officials in some circumstances.

If one of my students tells me privately they tested positive, may I tell the rest of the class?

No. This is a violation of a student’s privacy and confidentiality. Please encourage them to self-report their COVID-19 test result to the UCSB COVID-19 Call Center at ucsb-covid19@ucsb.edu, if the test was not done on campus, and continue to encourage students to practice personal protective measures such as wearing face coverings, keeping hands clean and not touching their face. 

Will instructors and students be notified when a student, positive for COVID-19, was in class?

If the UCSB case investigation determines there were exposed close contacts within a classroom, individuals will be notified. It will likely be necessary to notify the instructor and the entire class, when it cannot be determined who was within 6 feet of the case for 15 minutes or more.  

Who in the class must quarantine if another student tests positive for COVID-19?

Fully vaccinated persons with a potential exposure will be encouraged to obtain a COVID-19 test, but do not have to quarantine if they have no symptoms. Unvaccinated persons may have to quarantine for 10 days after a close contact exposure. Student Health will make every effort to identify those at most risk from the exposure.

Is there a specific fraction of students in a class who test positive that will trigger the class to automatically go remote?

The UCSB COVID-19 Medical Response Team works closely with the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department's COVID-19, and would consult them in any situation that involves a large number of COVID-19 cases. The campus response will depend on many factors, including the amount of COVID-19 cases in the surrounding community and the rate of spread of COVID-19 cases on campus. The campus continues to follow public health guidelines from our Santa Barbara County Public Health Officer, the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The campus regularly monitors these guidelines, and will make changes in our procedures as directed. If an outbreak, as defined by CDC, is detected, then the university will take appropriate action.

Permission to Teach and Learn Remotely (F21)

How much teaching can be done online for a course that is scheduled “in-person?”

Instructors are allowed to teach up to 50% of their course online without having to get approval from the Academic Senate. 50% is defined from the students’ perspective, on a weekly basis; inclusive of discussion sections. Office hours do not count toward the 50% and can be held in-person or remotely at the discretion of the instructor.

Per the Academic Senate "Guidance for Fall 2021 Instruction:”

"Normally, courses with precisely 50% in-person instruction... are considered to be online courses requiring Academic Senate approval. Since it will not be possible to evaluate such courses in time for fall 2021, the Senate will allow this teaching modality temporarily" (i.e. for the Fall 2021 term only).

How can an instructor or TA request permission to teach remotely?

Instructors and TAs with specific medical conditions may request accommodations  through the interactive workplace accommodation process with HR. That process is only available in cases where the employee's own serious health condition is at issue. Overseas employees who cannot enter the US due to visa or travel restrictions must follow the process outlined by Academic Personnel.

 

Instructors, including Teaching Associates and TAs,  who live with a family member or household member who is moderately to severely immunocompromised, as defined by the CDC’s current recommendations for an additional vaccine shot, may seek a workplace adjustment to teach remotely for Fall 2021, The workplace adjustment is offered at the discretion of the Academic Senate, and is different and distinct from workplace accommodations for the instructors themselves, which are assessed by the campus Workplace Accommodations Specialist in Human Resources. The Senate has delegated to the academic deans of the various Schools, Colleges, and Divisions the authority to grant a workplace adjustment involving remote teaching if the instructor provides the required attestation of cohabitation and physician’s certification.

If an instructor has permission to teach remotely, how are TAs expected to proceed?

All courses and sections that are scheduled in-person are expected to be taught in-person. An instructor’s accommodation or adjustment to teach remotely does not affect the way that a TA teaches discussion section or lab, and vice-versa.

Can instructors offer their office hours online, by Zoom, instead of hosting them in-person?

Yes. TAs may also hold office hours online, by Zoom, with the consent of the course instructor.

If an instructor or TA has to isolate or quarantine, or stay home to care for a dependent who is isolating or quarantined, may they teach remotely?

Excerpt from the Aug. 31 Divisional Chair’s Newsletter, “Guidelines for temporary remote instruction.”  

 

Instructors who are required to quarantine or isolate during fall quarter may be able to continue teaching, but only if they can do so remotely. Instructors who are parents of children required to quarantine or isolate may find themselves similarly constrained. In these cases, the Senate will allow a temporary exception to the requirement for in- person instruction, authorizing teaching in emergency remote mode. In each of the following scenarios, the instructor must notify their Chair and their students of any temporary change in the mode of instruction in a timely manner.

 

Quarantines. An instructor who is required by Public Health or campus officials to quarantine or isolate during fall quarter may continue to teach remotely during the medically-required quarantine or isolation period. An instructor who has direct care-giving responsibility for a child under the age of 12 who is required to quarantine or isolate during this time may choose to teach remotely during the child’s medically-required quarantine or isolation period. Remote teaching for the purpose of quarantine or isolation will not normally exceed 2 instructional weeks.

Childcare / K-8 school closures. If a childcare center or K-8 school in the County in which the instructor has one or more children under the age of 12 enrolled should close during the fall quarter due to the public health emergency, and the instructor has direct care-giving responsibilities for these children, the instructor may choose to teach remotely until such time as the childcare center or school reopens.

Temporary remote instruction during this type of instructor quarantine is expected to remain synchronous as much as possible, and when synchronous, must be offered at the regularly scheduled class time. Instructors should remain local and be available to restart in-person instruction as soon as conditions allow.

How should instructors respond to remote instruction requests from students?

Adapted from the Aug. 31 Divisional Chairs Newsletter:

We have heard several reports of students being advised (inappropriately) by various campus offices to contact instructors and/or departments directly to request remote instruction in courses that are currently scheduled to be offered in-person. Faculty should not act in response to these requests. Nonetheless, recording audio and powerpoint with Gauchocast/Panopto for posting to Gauchospace was a standard practice for some instructors even pre-COVID, and is allowed at the discretion of the instructor. Students with disabilities that might impact their ability to attend in-person instruction must be directed to the Disabled Students Program. International students who are unable to enter (or re-enter) the country due to visa processing issues should contact the academic advising unit in their College for guidance.

What do I do when a student requests DSP accommodation?

DSP accommodation procedures remain consistent. Students should be referred to the Disabled Students Program, who will make a determination about the student’s request and communicate with instructors to discuss potential accommodations.

Fall 2021 Keep Teaching Announcements

Teaching Modes: In-person, Mixed, and Online

The image below describes some teaching modes that may be useful for Fall 2021. Please contact Instructional Development to discuss what might work best for your courses.

Options for Limited Capacity Teaching Modes: In person, Alternating in-person and online, Simultaneous in-person and online, synchronous fully online, or asynchronous fully online.
Options for limited capacity teaching in Fall 2021

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